Indiana Two-Stage Channels

Creel Post Construction.jpg

Creel Ditch is an incised channel draining a 4.7-square mile watershed of row crops and pasture (69%), water and wetlands (16%), forest (8%), and low and high density development (6%). In 2006, The Nature Conservancy – Upper St. Joseph Project Office received a grant from The Joyce Foundation to implement conservation practices in the Creel Ditch watershed to reduce sedimentation to the downstream receiving system, Fish Creek....


Davis-Freeman Ditch Post-ConstructionDavis-Freeman Ditch is in the Little Cedar Creek watershed, an area identified in the Cedar Creek Watershed Plan (2005) as a critical area providing excessive sediment to Cedar Creek. The channel drains a watershed consisting of row crops and pasture (73%), forest (16%), urban and residential areas (7%), and water and wetlands (3%). Soil types in the watershed include Hydrologic Soil Groups A, B, C, and D. The drainage channel was maintained or “dipped out” in 2007 to enhance conveyance capacity and improve the function of subsurface drainage systems in the adjacent fields.....


Shatto DitchShatto Ditch drains a watershed with row crops and agriculture (90%), forest (3%), residential areas (5%), and water and wetlands (1%). Watershed soils include Hydrologic Soil Groups A, B, C, and D. The project was initiated by The Nature Conservancy and was funded in part through an EPA Indiana Department of Environmental Management 319 grant.  The project was intended to be a demonstration project to introduce Indiana to the 2-stage ditch concept and to evaluate the impacts of installation in the field.  The Nature Conservancy, Kosciusko County Surveyor, and the local NRCS....


Van Gorder Post-Construction

Van Gorder Ditch is in the Little Cedar Creek watershed, an area identified in the Cedar Creek Watershed Plan (2005) as a critical area providing excessive sediment to Cedar Creek. The channel drains a watershed consisting of row crops and pasture (68%), forest (6%), urban and residential areas (22%), and water and wetlands (4%).  Van Gorder Ditch was a trapezoidal shape and required frequent maintenance to reconstruct the original shape and required frequent maintenance to reconstruct the original shape. This may be in part due to the development of residential and urban.....